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Can dogs eat peaches? Dietary advice and feeding tips

can dogs eat peaches
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Can dogs eat peaches? It's a valid question to ask - after all, fruit is delicious, and dogs love to beg, but not all human food is safe for dogs. Peaches also have health benefits for humans, but that doesn't necessarily mean they'll do the same for your pup. 

It's important to ask what human food can dogs eat, and do the necessary research to ensure you aren't giving your dog anything that could be dangerous for them. When choosing healthy dog treats, we have to be smart and make sure we know what's good and what isn't. 

You may prefer to just stick to the best dog food and avoid the human food altogether, but perhaps you want to give your dog an occasional fruity treat.

So, can dogs each peaches? The good answer is: yes, but it's not so simple. Read on for more. 

Are peaches good for dogs?

Peaches are packed with nutrients and make for an extra juicy snack for us humans, so it's only natural you'd wonder if your canine companion can take a bite too. 

Your dog can eat peaches, and they do offer some great nutrients like vitamin A and fiber. Small, cut-up pieces of the fleshy part of the piece are safe to give to your dog, but make sure that you rinse them thoroughly before sharing, as most fruit you buy in the store has been treated with pesticides. 

Peaches can also help fight infections, so it's definitely a healthy choice for your pup.

When are peaches bad for dogs?

The peach pit, or stone, contains a sugar-cyanide compound known as amygdalin, which is toxic for dogs. While it would take several stones to seriously harm your dog, there's no point in giving your dog something that could be dangerous.

Do not give your dog an entire peach, as they could very easily swallow the stone - which could also get stuck in their throat. 

Plus peach pits are very abrasive and rough, so they can irritate your dog's esophagus or small intestine. The peach stem and leaves will also contain cyanide, so if you pick them yourself or get them from your Sunday farmer's market, make sure to remove them. 

Never give your dog canned or preserved peaches as they have a ton of sugar and artificial sweeteners in them that will not sit well with puppy. 

Also, keep in mind that any new food introduced to your dog's diet can cause them to have diarrhea or other upset tummy reactions, so keep an eye out. 

dog lying on sofa

(Image credit: Getty Images)

Tips on feeding your dog peaches

Make sure to give your dog peaches in small amounts as they get used to the new food, and always cut them up into bite-sized chunks. 

Moderation is key here, as dogs have much more sensitive stomachs than we do and aren't used to ingesting sugar. Peaches cannot replace a meal for your dog, as they are naturally carnivores/slightly omnivorous and will benefit from meat protein. 

And if you're concerned because your dog may have a sensitive stomach, ask your veterinarian if peaches are a good thing to introduce to their diet. 

If your dog is getting bored of the best dog treats from the pet store then peaches can make a good substitute.

There are plenty of recipes for homemade dog treats but here are a few quick suggestions that use peaches:

  • Freeze them in ice cubes - cut up peach slices and put them in ice cube trays, then pour a little water over them and pop them in the fridge.
  • Put them in a Kong - cut up peaches and put them in your dog's Kong or other treat-dispensing toy and watch them go crazy for them!

Conclusion 

Peaches are safe for your dog to eat, but as always with new food, moderation is key. Make sure to cut peaches up into small, easy-to-digest pieces, and discard the stone or peach pit as they are toxic for your dog. 

And again, ask your vet if you're especially concerned so that you can make sure your furbaby is getting the best food and treats possible. But in small doses, the delicious summer fruit is just peachy for your dog.