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Dogo Argentino vs Cane Corso: Which breed is best for you?

Dogo Argentino
(Image credit: Getty Image)

If you’ve been mulling over the Dogo Argentino vs Cane Corso pups in an effort to decide which one is the canine companion for you, then you’ve come to the right place because you’ll find everything you need to know about these two breeds right here.

It’s not unusual for people to confuse these two dogs, because while they may be different colors, they both share the same large and muscular stature. And while there are a lot of similarities between the Dogo Argentino and Cane Corso, there are a few differences that can help you determine which of these pups is the right one for you.

Below, we talk you through how these two breeds came to be, while also exploring their temperaments, exercise and grooming needs, and how easy they are to train. By the time you reach the end, you’ll be an expert in both breeds and choosing the right one for you will be a piece of cake!

Dogo Argentino vs Cane Corso: Origins

The Dogo Argentino hails from, yip, you guessed it - Argentina! A descendent of the now extinct Fighting Dog of Cordoba, the Dogo Argentino was bred by Antonio Martinez in the 1920s to suppress the aggressive instincts of its ancestor and create a breed that could be trained to follow an alpha in a pack.

Half a world away, the Cane Corso developed in Italy and descends from Roman war dogs. Its extinct ancestor, the Molossus, was a mastiff-type dog and the Cane Corso was originally bred to participate in hunting games and guard property.

Dogo Argentino vs Cane Corso: Size and appearance

You’ve probably spotted the obvious difference between these two breeds, with the Dogo Argentino being white with a darker patch around the eyes and the Cane Corso being typically black, although they can also come in fawn, red and gray colors. But color isn’t the only thing that sets these two dogs apart.

The Dogo Argentino has a short and smooth coat and large head that is supported by a thick yet elegant neck. Their bodies are balanced and sturdy with straight forelegs and muscular hindquarters and they tend to have an elegant and slender appearance. Like the Cane Corso, males tend to grow to around 27 inches, with females around 25-26 inches.

While the Cane Corso is also large and muscular, he’s also far bulkier than the Dogo and weighs anywhere up to 150lbs vs the Dogo’s far smaller 100lb stature. The Cane Corso has the same short coat as the Dogo, but it tends to be thicker and stiffer and they tend to have a slightly more intimidating appearance.

Dogo Argentino vs Cane Corso: Temperament

There’s not much separating these two breeds when it comes to temperament and personality, although the Dogo is a bit more reserved and even-tempered . Both make outstanding guard dogs and protectors, which is hardly surprising given their history and lineage. 

That being said, because they come from war and fighting dog stock, both the Dogo and the Cane Corso are prone to aggression if they’re not socialized properly from a young age. And while they’re intensely loyal to their humans, they can be wary of strangers and assertive and willful.

And yet at the same time, both breeds are loving, devoted, affectionate, caring and extremely good with their owners' children, who they will protect as if they were their own pups. To bring out their best traits and avoid any problems, they’re best suited to confident handlers who will teach them their place in the pack.

Dogo Argentino vs Cane Corso: Intelligence and trainability

Cane Corso

(Image credit: Getty Images)

Because both the Dogo Argentino and the Cane Corso are highly intelligent, they respond best to owners who are very confident and extremely consistent. Both have the tendency to overstep boundaries and dominate the household, which is why training is so key, although the Cane Corso is slightly more submissive.

And while they are fast learners, their strong willed natures can cause them to be resistant to implementing what they’ve learned. They do, however, respond very well to a calm approach and lots of positive reinforcement. 

Because of their natural distrust of strangers, early socialization is key to ensure they don’t become dangerous. This is a powerful dog that requires an experienced leader, and if they have that, both of these breeds are capable of displaying high levels of obedience.

Dogo Argentino vs Cane Corso: Exercise needs

These are two very energetic dogs with a high prey drive who require serious exercise - you’re looking at a good two hours a day of physical and mental stimulation. 

Mix it up each day with walks, hikes, bike rides, as well as some indoor games for dogs like hide-and-seek, puzzle feeders and teaching tricks. They also excel at agility and obedience events, so training them for these will keep them happy. 

Neither dog is suitable for apartment living as they don’t like small spaces and need plenty of room to run and play. You’ll want a good fenced backyard and we recommend you don’t let them off the lead in public as their recall when distracted isn’t good.

Dogo Argentino vs Cane Corso: Grooming

If you’re looking for a dog that will be low maintenance on the grooming front then either of these breeds are a good choice. Apart from during the two shedding seasons in spring and fall, both dogs hardly shed and their short and tight coats require little other than a light brushing once or twice a week with one of the best dog brushes - we recommend a soft bristle brush for these breeds..

As with all dogs, you’ll want to invest in a pair of the best dog nail clippers and give them a regular pup pedicure to prevent their nails from becoming overgrown and they don’t require regular bathing. The Dogo in particular is known for being very clean with little doggie odor. 

Kathryn Rosenberg

Kathryn is a freelance writer who has spent the past two years dividing her writing time between her two great loves - pets and health and wellness. When she’s not busy crafting the perfect sentence for her features, buying guides and news pieces, she can be found hanging out with one very mischievous Cocker Spaniel, drinking copious amounts of Jasmine tea and attempting to set numerous world records for the longest ever FaceTime calls with her family back home in NZ.